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Ten Little-Known Trivia Facts About American Horror Story Asylum – We Bet You Haven’t Heard Them All Yet!

Mrs. Horror Boom (HorrorBoom.com):

An oldie, but a goodie. Thanks for for being patient , you guys… new content is coming!

Originally posted on HORROR BOOM:

Some of these you may have read or heard; others also obsessed with American Horror Story Asylum may know most. However, I’m thinking you’ll read at least one fact you didn’t know, hopefully more! I cited sources when I could, or links to the articles I came across the info or quotes in. A couple I stumbled upon by accident –I was trying to find more than ten, so I could weed out a few of the blander ones–even surprised me.  Let’s start things off with a bang (so to speak)…

Ryan Murphy told EW.com that Cromwell said, “Well you have to fucking cast my son — he looks just like me.’  He walked in and indeed he did. We cast him on the spot… it was perfect.”

1. Well, If you’re one of the many ladies and gentlemen out there who find Evan Peters yummy, you might have heard…

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New Body trailer is a holiday nightmare!

Mrs. Horror Boom (HorrorBoom.com):

We are blessed with three holiday-themed horror flicks this year! I haven’t seen this (or Krampus) yet, but I have seen the anthology flick A Christmas Horror Story and enjoyed it so much I may buy a copy! Check out ACHS when you can, and check out this trailer (great poster, too).

Originally posted on Rhino's Horror:

After a highly praised festival run, Dan Berk and Robert Olsen’s Christmas-set horror tale Body is making its way into our lives in just over a month, so to celebrate the occasion we have an all-new theatrical trailer for the Holiday-themed thriller! This comes right on the heels of a new poster, which is a thing of minimalistic beauty—find it below along with the trailer!

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Trick ‘R Treat director’s new holiday horror Krampus gets a trailer!

Mrs. Horror Boom (HorrorBoom.com):

Now this is more like it! Hope this gets a regular theatrical release, since it’ll be here just in time for the holidays!

Originally posted on Rhino's Horror:

There’s one place that the genre doesn’t explore nearly enough and that is Christmas. Sure, there are plenty of classic holiday horror films—Black Christmas, Silent Night Deadly Night, and Gremlins come to mind—but it’s still a largely untapped area for the genre (at least as far as good horror goes). That’s why Michael Dougherty’s Krampus is such a special occasion because not only is this his first film since 2007’s Halloween classic Trick ‘R Treat, but his latest is going straight for the throat of the Christmas season. Better hope you’re not on the naughty list!

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Review: The Editor, cutting room carnage

Mrs. Horror Boom (HorrorBoom.com):

We are going to be checking this out as soon as we can!

Originally posted on Rhino's Horror:

Long gone are the days of giallo cinema, a genre that really came into its own during the 70s and 80s with films like Deep RedTenebrae and Stagefright leaving an indelible mark on horror. While the genre has almost become a lost art in the world of film, every once in a while we see a movie that captures the very spirit of Italy’s neon thrillers. And although they are few and far between, a modern-day giallo film is a nice little treat to the genre, especially when they’re as bloody red and ridiculous as Adam Brooks and Matthew Kennedy’s The Editor. In it, a film editor with a wooden hand gets entangled in a web of murders in which he becomes the prime suspect.

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Film Review: ‘The Gallows’

Mrs. Horror Boom (HorrorBoom.com):

Getting locked inside an empty school at night is a solidly bone-chilling premise for teens, and a certain subset of that audience won’t mind that nearly every one of Lofing and Cluff’s ostensibly scary setpieces can be seen coming a mile away (mostly because we’ve already seen them in other movies). Loud noises, narrow corridors, locker doors opening and closing on their own, a television set that turns on by itself to provide expositional news footage — “The Gallows” isn’t without a certain amount of atmosphere, it simply feels borrowed wholesale.

-from the Variety.com review by Geoff Berkshire

I should note that this is one of the kinder reviews I’ve read so far of this movie. This movie was already asking for it with the ad campaign, which had the nerve to compare the killer to Leatherface and Jason Vorhees. Read on…

Originally posted on Variety:

One advantage of selling horror movies to teenagers is that they’re less likely to already know all the genre tropes. That’s about the only thing working for [pmc_film_review_snippet]“The Gallows,” a routine found-footage chiller of interest mostly to those who weren’t yet old enough to catch “Paranormal Activity” in its theatrical release a mere six years ago.[/pmc_film_review_snippet] Fortunately, the microbudget feature helming debut of Chris Lofing and Travis Cluff has a relatively low bar to clear at the B.O., even if grosses fall short of the summer’s other spookfests, “Poltergeist” and “Insidious: Chapter 3.”

The filmmakers quickly establish their mythology in an effective enough urban-legend-caught-on-videotape opening sequence set in 1993, in which Nebraska high-school thespian Charlie Grimille literally dies onstage in a freak accident during a school play. Twenty years later, the school has rather inexplicably scheduled a tribute performance of the same play, titled “The Gallows,” despite concerns from some…

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The Month in Horror Releases: July

Mrs. Horror Boom (HorrorBoom.com):

Man, July is PACKED with new releases! Thanks, Ryan!

Originally posted on Rhino's Horror:

The summer season isn’t exactly known for producing quality horror, but with the recent boom in VOD releases, we’re starting to see some of the best films the genre has to offer as they quietly sneak around the blockbusters. And while July doesn’t have the strongest line-up we’ve seen this year, it does offer a diverse group of films, some of which could turn out to be the surprise hits of the year. Before we get started, here’s a quick recap of what I watched in June:

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‘Hannibal’: Producers Stoke Fan Support with ‘#SaveHannibal’ Twitter Campaign

Mrs. Horror Boom (HorrorBoom.com):

Welp, as you may have read today, we Hannibal fans got some rotten news: the current season three will be the show’s last, as goddamned NBC has decided to cancel it. On the plus side, however, devoted fans are taking to social media (and more) to try to talk some sense into NBC. This will probably not work, but hopefully it will garner enough attention from providers like, say, Netflix, to pick the show up for another season or two. Check out this Variety piece, especially if you want a link to the change.org petition, which is really picking up speed. You can also call or email Netflix to urge them to pick Hannibal up. Meanwhile, keep your fingers crossed…

Originally posted on Variety:

“Hannibal” is not going quietly.

As word spread of NBC’s decision to cancel the show after the conclusion of its third season in August, producers took to the Twitterverse with a #SaveHannibal campaign to demonstrate the depth of the show’s fan engagement to prospective new outlets.

Producers Gaumont Intl. Television and Martha De Laurentiis of the De Laurentiis Co. are actively shopping the show to new buyers, ranging from digital outlets to cable channels. The prequel to “Silence of the Lambs” reportedly had plans to introduce the Clarice Starling character, played by Jodie Foster in the Oscar-winning 1991 movie, in its fourth season.

In the meantime, the show’s hardcore fans, known as “Fannibals,” are keeping the show trending in the U.S. and other markets on social-media platforms. Exec producer Bryan Fuller, who just last week earned a series greenlight for a fantasy drama at Starz, “American Gods,” also has a dedicated…

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Film Review: ‘Insidious: Chapter 3’ – Variety Says This Is Weakest Chapter in Series

Mrs. Horror Boom (HorrorBoom.com):

“It’s all the more puzzling, then, that “Insidious: Chapter 3” keeps Shaye in the shadows for so much of its running time, and keeps Specs and Tucker (introduced as bumbling practitioners of a YouTube ghostbusting channel) on ice for even longer. During most of that time, Whannell tries his hand at the kind of atmospheric, slow-burn scares that made Wan’s films textbook examples of what Roger Ebert termed “bruised forearm movies” (so named the intensity with which they cause your date to squeeze your antebrachium). But whereas Wan (who retains a producer credit here, and makes a cameo appearance) is the sort of director who can effortlessly turn a billowing curtain or creaking floorboard into an unbearable portent of dread, Whannell rarely makes the neck hairs quiver, let alone stand at attention. The only risk of arm injury here comes from the frequent checking of one’s watch.

Around the one-hour mark, once Whannell finally has the whole ghost-hunting band back together again, “Insidious: Chapter 3” gives off a few fleeting sparks of pleasure and conjures up a couple of memorably creepy images (including that of a half-formed woman with no face, hands, or feet). But what, finally, can one say about a movie in which the family being haunted seems more embalmed than the ghosts doing the haunting?”

-From the Variety.com review by Scott Foundas

Sadly, we have heard the similar things from several other reviews. About the only upside here is saving the high cost of a ticket price, but we were hopeful this would be worth going out to see and scream at the top of our lungs a few times. If you’ve seen it, and think this review is too hard on Insidious: Chapter 3, please do tell!

You can read the entire review by clicking “View original” on the lower left.

Originally posted on Variety:

Chief among things that go bump in the night in “Insidious: Chapter 3” is the movie itself — a thuddingly dull prequel to James Wan’s very enjoyable (and highly profitable) demonic-possession horror franchise. Like last year’s subpar “The Conjuring” spinoff “Annabelle,”[pmc_film_review_snippet] this direly routine ghost story marks a huge comedown in production values and performance quality from the series’ previous entries[/pmc_film_review_snippet] (which earned a combined $258 million worldwide), despite the presence of longtime Wan collaborator Leigh Whannell behind the camera and always game-faced elder scream queen Lin Shaye in front of it. But the movie’s cardinal sin is that it’s a stifling bore — a “chapter” even devotees may deem less than essential summer reading.

After devoting two films to the bedevilment of the Lambert family — specifically, a spooky old hag that had attached itself to patriarch Josh (Patrick Wilson) from childhood — the “Insidious” series seemed poised to continue…

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Variety Review: ‘Poltergeist’ Remake “Entertaining Yet Fundamentally Unnecessary”

Mrs. Horror Boom (HorrorBoom.com):

“The cast largely acquit themselves well, even when deprived of much opportunity to really develop their characters… Rockwell plays the slightly boozy, goofy father figure with great charm and likability, and Catlett makes for a believably wise, harried tyke of the Haley Joel Osment mold. DeWitt is unfortunately rather ill served by the film’s most significant divergence from the original, which robs the character of her great moment of maternal heroism. Harris, taking over for Zelda Rubinstein, has fun channeling another vintage Spielberg production, “Jaws,” as a rough, scarred, Quint-essential spook-hunter. Visually speaking, Javier Aguirresarobe’s photography is solid — and while generally unnecessary, the 3D work sometimes adds an extra layer of claustrophobia to the creeping interior shots — yet the film’s attempts to illustrate the spirit world bring to mind Nine Inch Nails videos more readily than any otherworldly chthonian purgatory. Composer Marc Streitenfeld turns in a largely effective score, though it can’t help but pale in comparison to Jerry Goldsmith’s Oscar-nominated original. ..Even when one is inclined to admire the cleverness with which the remake revisits and reincorporates “Poltergeist’s” themes, it’s hard to pinpoint a single moment where it improves on them, and the aura of inessentiality hangs thick over the proceedings. Some franchises die, but they don’t know they’re gone. And then some franchises just get lost on their way to the reboot.”

-From the Variety review by Andrew Barker

This isn’t a huge shock, but we are kind of disappointed… we really needed a good scream or two in the movie theater (It Follows literally only played here in town one weekend, at a venue that is now a huge pain in the ass to get anywhere near thanks to traffic revisions), but this doesn’t look like it will fit the bill. Despite the fact this review compares the movie to a guided tour through a county-fair-style haunted house and states it has some quality jump scares, nothing in this review–and the others we’ve read–makes us feel like seeing it in the theater rather than waiting for VOD/Blu-ray. OK, if someone sent a car and driver to pick us up, and the movie was free, we’d go. However, reviews for Poltergeist 2015 tend to start waxing sentimental about the original, and saying though the movie tries to recapture the magic and mood Tobe Hooper was able to craft perfectly in 1982, the bottom line is that this reboot was unnecessary horror remake for a beloved, fan-favorite movie that did just fine (well, much better than fine) the first time around.


This is what happens when you move the headstones but you don’t move the bodies!


Oh, and from what I’ve heard, there isn’t even really a tip of the hat to the scene in the original where a member of the first group of paranormalists studying the ghostly activity hallucinated clawing his own face off (which they could never, ever get away with putting in a PG-rated movie these days; in fact, it was borderline R-rated). I am not saying they had to duplicate it, but give us something other than the clown doll, the tree, and “They’re here/This house is clean,” for Chrissake! Check out this piece we wrote when the first trailers of the movie went online for more, including the actual gory scene (we recalled adults in the audience yelling “HOAH!” in horrified surprise even louder than the kids our age).

If you’ve seen the original and the remake, and you feel like this review was too hard on the movie, please tell us about it. We would love to be proved wrong about the face-ripping scene, too!

Read on by clicking “View original” in the lower left…

Originally posted on Variety:

The closing credits for Gil Kenan’s remake of the 1982 horror classic “Poltergeist” feature the band Spoon covering the Cramps’ 1980 punk classic “TV Set.” Spoon is a tasteful, studious yet largely anodyne indie rock outfit that has become an NPR staple; the Cramps were a scuzzy, unhinged psychobilly band whose most famous gig took place in an actual mental hospital. It’s hard to think of a more fitting postscript for this professionally executed yet bloodless film, itself an act of homage that hews reverently to its source material while missing the essential spirit and vitality that once powered it. [pmc_film_review_snippet]Generally entertaining yet fundamentally unnecessary[/pmc_film_review_snippet], this tribute-band take on one of the genre’s greatest hits should score decent opening weekend numbers before finding its way into the light.

In addition to being one of the most unsettling PG-rated films ever made, the original “Poltergeist” — directed by Tobe Hooper, with not-insignificant input…

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Film Review: ‘The Human Centipede III (Final Sequence)’

Mrs. Horror Boom (HorrorBoom.com):

It would be stretching things to the breaking point to suggest “Final Sequence” actually has something to say about the U.S. prison industry. The concept alone suggests as much, yet only near the end does the script transcend a simpleminded need to offend long enough to make even a crudely satirical statement about profit-driven institutional policies or inmate abuse. The ad line brags “100% Politically Incorrect,” but the writer-helmer’s achievement on that level is perhaps most comparable to junior high bathroom-wall graffiti: Six just wants to shock, though his imagination is so primitive that the effort is strained and a bit pathetic. Initially abrasive, the whole enterprise grows simply tedious well before the now-epically-scaled titular phenom is unveiled in the prison yard.

-From the Variety Review by Dennis Harvey

OK, so Variety.com does not have good things to say about the third Human Centipede movie. This is not exactly a huge surprise. Are you going to watch it out of morbid curiosity?

Originally posted on Variety:

Rarely has the word “final” been so welcome in a title as it is in “The Human Centipede III (Final Sequence).” [pmc_film_review_snippet]Tom Six’s latest, largest-scaled and most lamentable entry yet in the gross-out horror series manages to be completely obnoxious even before the gross stuff kicks in.[/pmc_film_review_snippet] Of course, that will only heighten its curiosity value among the usual seekers of lowest-level genre excess. Pic opens May 22 in New York and Los Angeles, though as with its predecessors, primary fan access will be through simultaneous release to VOD.

The prior chapters’ leads return in new roles here as warden and accountant of the George H.W. Bush State Prison, a (presumably Texan) hellhole experiencing constant staff turnover and inmate violence. Only exacerbating those woes is cartoonishly maniacal Bill Boss (the original “Centipede’s” mad doctor, Dieter Laser), a chrome-domed German of a type that would seem over-the-top even in 1970s Italian Nazisploitation…

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