‘The Simpsons’: Guillermo del Toro on creating the epic opening to ‘Treehouse of Horror XXIV’

If you’re getting the sense that del Toro is a big fan of The Simpsons, you’re right. Not only did he slip a few homages to The Simpsons in Hellboy (“Mmmm, nachos” “Why you little…!”), he has a room in his house that’s brimming with Simpsons memorabilia. “My favorite is a 30-inch tall Mr. Burns as Dracula that they only make in Germany,” he says. “It’s a really good sculpture. It’s going to run away eventually, but I think that’s very appropriate.”

-from the EW.com article by Dan Snierson

Don’t miss this! It is almost impossible to count the homages and references here. The classic Universal Studios monsters, artist Charles Burns, Brian DePalma‘s Phantom of Paradise, Lovecraft, Bong June Ho’s The Host, Ray Bradbury‘s The Illustrated Man (short story collection and the movie), Todd Browning’s Freaks (watch for the pinhead from the movie; I’d say it was an American Horror Story Asylum reference but it’s in a shot with a bunch of really old-school monsters and aliens, including the Ray Harryhausen skeletons)… they have to be into the triple-digits. Mrs. Horror Boom was going to be all clever and try and list them all, but that’s pretty time-consuming even without a nasty headache. Of course, special attention is paid to Guillermo Del Toro‘s movies (even ones that most moviegoers aren’t familiar with), especially Pan’s Labyrinth. Just check out the screen caps in the gallery link right here, and see how many you can spot… and enjoy this year’s Treehouse of Horror, which airs this Sunday, October 6th!

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Check Out Horror Photographer Josh Hoffine’s Take On H.P. Lovecraft!

 If I had ever seen what Pickman saw—but no! Here, let’s have a drink before we get any deeper. Gad, I wouldn’t be alive if I’d ever seen what that man—if he was a man—saw!  Pickman’s Model, ©H.P. Lovecraft, 1926

 

Another great piece on a great series by Joshua Hoffine. This time he doesn’t take on Jack the Ripper – he takes on Lovecraft‘s Pickman’s Model, and knocks it out of the fucking North End park. Don’t miss this! By the way, if you haven’t read Pickman’s Model, the H.P. Lovecraft story can be found online to read here – it creeps me out to this day, and I highly recommend it. I also love the Hammer Horror look Mr. Hoffine achieved with this flawless, atmospheric series. If you want to see more on his Jack the Ripper series, I reblogged it here.  I also can’t recommend looking at Joshua Hoffine’s online portfolio enough – but not if you plan on getting a good night’s sleep! If you’d like to see an example to decide whether or not you should perhaps peruse his online portfolio in the daytime, or when you’re not the only one awake in the house, here’s a link to one of his scariest, titled Refrigerator, from the After Dark, My Sweet Series. I personally find this series deeply frightening, in fact the most frightening of any of his work (and that’s really saying something) probably because it preys on childhood fears, the monster hiding just around the corner or in the dark under the stairs. You haven’t seen it yet, you sense your worst nightmare is within grabbing reach of you,  you’re too terrified to turn around and look directly at it …but it  has seen you.

Joshua Hoffine | Behind The Scenes

This is a recent project I photographed for Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine called PICKMAN’S MASTERPIECE.

This sequence of images is based on a 1927 short story by H.P. Lovecraft called Pickman’s Model.  I was attracted to this project because of the character of Pickman – who in Lovecraft’s mythology is a brilliant but marginalized artist notorious for his horrifying artwork.  Due to the graphic and disturbing nature of his work, he is shunned by his fellow artists.

Pickman is my patron saint.

I focused on the moment in the story when Pickman brings his last willing patron into his underground studio to show him his Masterpiece – his greatest and worst work – the one that can never be shown in public.

What he reveals is too much for the human mind to bear.

Instead of creating one heroic image, I wanted to create a sequence of images…

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