Making INNSMOUTH

Whether you’re a Joshua Hoffine fan or not (though I can think of no good reason why any horror fan would not dig him), and whether you’re a Lovecraft fan or not, you owe it to yourself to check out the artist’s blog post on his latest piece–hell, we can’t think of a reason not to call it a masterpiece– titled INNSMOUTH. The creation boasts the absolutely stellar work of J. Anthony Kosar and his talented team at Kosart Studios; just when I think their effects/prosthetic work cannot get any better, it does. Hoffine was also able to get Doug Jones to star in the piece (no, not as an eerily thin creature of some kind) as the hero. Mr. Hoffine’s talent, paired with the top-tier dedication to putting the most care, concern, and craftsmanship into his creations possible into every detail, is well on display here. He even takes you step-by-step through his entire process (with lots of great behind-the-scenes photos and backstory). The attribute of his art that shines through, however, that puts him on a level with the best horror artists among, say, Bernie Wrightson, is his true love of and devotion to the horror genre. True horror fans can see and feel the heart (no pun intended) and soul of a kindred horror fan as soon as you lay eyes on his art …and that’s not common to find, these days. Enjoy!

Joshua Hoffine | Behind The Scenes

Hi kiddies!

This is my new photograph called INNSMOUTH.  This image is based on the story Shadow Over Innsmouth by legendary Horror author H.P. Lovecraft. This photograph stars actor Doug Jones (Hellboy, Pan’s Labyrinth) as the victim and features Special FX from frequent collaborator and Face/Off champion J. Anthony Kosar and his talented team at Kosart Studios.

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In the 1931 story Shadow Over Innsmouth, the human victim is chased through the streets of the seaside town of Innsmouth by a teeming mob of monstrous fish people called the Deep Ones. The imagery of a sole individual being pursued by a city full of monsters is similar to Invasion of The Body Snatchers, I Am Legend, or any modern zombie movie, but exists first in Shadow Over Innsmouth.  As with my previous zombie photograph LAST STAND, INNSMOUTH is populated by a horde of monsters…

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Check Out Horror Photographer Josh Hoffine’s Take On H.P. Lovecraft!

 If I had ever seen what Pickman saw—but no! Here, let’s have a drink before we get any deeper. Gad, I wouldn’t be alive if I’d ever seen what that man—if he was a man—saw!  Pickman’s Model, ©H.P. Lovecraft, 1926

 

Another great piece on a great series by Joshua Hoffine. This time he doesn’t take on Jack the Ripper – he takes on Lovecraft‘s Pickman’s Model, and knocks it out of the fucking North End park. Don’t miss this! By the way, if you haven’t read Pickman’s Model, the H.P. Lovecraft story can be found online to read here – it creeps me out to this day, and I highly recommend it. I also love the Hammer Horror look Mr. Hoffine achieved with this flawless, atmospheric series. If you want to see more on his Jack the Ripper series, I reblogged it here.  I also can’t recommend looking at Joshua Hoffine’s online portfolio enough – but not if you plan on getting a good night’s sleep! If you’d like to see an example to decide whether or not you should perhaps peruse his online portfolio in the daytime, or when you’re not the only one awake in the house, here’s a link to one of his scariest, titled Refrigerator, from the After Dark, My Sweet Series. I personally find this series deeply frightening, in fact the most frightening of any of his work (and that’s really saying something) probably because it preys on childhood fears, the monster hiding just around the corner or in the dark under the stairs. You haven’t seen it yet, you sense your worst nightmare is within grabbing reach of you,  you’re too terrified to turn around and look directly at it …but it  has seen you.

Joshua Hoffine | Behind The Scenes

This is a recent project I photographed for Famous Monsters of Filmland magazine called PICKMAN’S MASTERPIECE.

This sequence of images is based on a 1927 short story by H.P. Lovecraft called Pickman’s Model.  I was attracted to this project because of the character of Pickman – who in Lovecraft’s mythology is a brilliant but marginalized artist notorious for his horrifying artwork.  Due to the graphic and disturbing nature of his work, he is shunned by his fellow artists.

Pickman is my patron saint.

I focused on the moment in the story when Pickman brings his last willing patron into his underground studio to show him his Masterpiece – his greatest and worst work – the one that can never be shown in public.

What he reveals is too much for the human mind to bear.

Instead of creating one heroic image, I wanted to create a sequence of images…

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