Scariest Short Horror Film Of The Week: “There’s No Such Thing…” (Drew Daywalt)

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Last time we ran this feature, we had a pretty creepy “check under the bed for monsters”-themed short film, The Little Witch (watch it here). We actually have a total of three of these short films based on monsters under the bed, so it would do you good to watch all three (the third is coming next, hang in there) as they are all clever, have very different outcomes, and will scare the hell out of you.

Check out Drew Daywalt’s scary 2010 short “There’s No Such Thing…” below…

This is why, as a child, I never asked my mom or dad to check under the bed for monsters  when they tucked me in. And I sure as hell wasn’t going to check myself…

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Check out Horror Artist Joshua Hoffine’s Making JACK THE RIPPER!

Hell, just check out Joshua Hoffine, for starters. His still photography is some of the most creative– and downright nightmarish– imagery I’ve ever seen outside of a horror movie. I’ve been following Joshua Hoffine since an article in Fangoria a few years back did a feature on his art that just fucking blew me away. I’ve been keeping tabs on his work through his website on a regular basis ever since. His new projects never cease to amaze and frighten me; JACK THE RIPPER is no exception. I’ll be sure to share more content from his blog and site with you.  While I admire his entire portfolio, I especially enjoy his pieces that draw inspiration from childhood nightmares (the monsters waiting under your bed, in the dark space of a closet or under the basement stairs), or urban legends (the maniac escaped from a mental institution who just so happens to be hiding in your house …and has almost made his way to grabbing range of you).

Don’t miss it …but at the same time, remember much of what you see will be burned into the inside of your eyelids for years!

-Mrs. Horror Boom

Joshua Hoffine | Behind The Scenes

This is my new photo project titled JACK THE RIPPER.

It is a 2-panel diptych.

Put together, JACK THE RIPPER 1 & 2 depict the moments “just before” and “just after” a grisly alleyway murder.

What makes Jack the Ripper so compelling is that nothing is factually known about him.  Because he was never caught, we have no information about who he was or why he committed his gruesome crimes.  We do not possess a historical or biographical portrait, but instead share a communally imagined idea of Jack the Ripper as an aristocratic predator.  As a boogeyman, he graphically symbolizes the idea of the wealthy preying on the poor.

For the brick alleyway, I decided to build a set.  The walls were made from large sheets of styrofoam that I carved and sculpted to look like brick using a hot-knife and heat gun.

My cousins Steve Hoffine and Jerry Hoffine…

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